Coping Copy

Our reality of existence straddles two plains; an online realm and the physical space, often becoming parallel representations of one another. Using this model as a mode of presentation, Coping Copy at Konstanet, simultaneously displays work online and in a gallery space. In Coping Copy, the underlying themes of relationships, technology, and memory are negotiated through video, text, and sculpture. Titled after the 1977 tabletop role-playing game Traveller, Jeffrey Scudder engineered software to create a single pixel continuously moving within a blank screen. Through unconventional narrative, Traveller explores how language and drawing, which is often thought of as poetic expression, has become increasingly systematized by computer software in the attempt to find rationalization.

In an act of recontextualization, Jennyfer Haddad has altered the entire space with two text boxes on opposing walls of the gallery that she has painted entirely half green and half pink. One of the text boxes contains a question that the artist asked google. Opposite of this is the other text box with the resulting answer from another user. Jennyfer’s work seeks to place the viewer in the realm of fantasy, looking beyond the limiting parameters of reality. Deirdre Sargent’s strategic positioning of sculpture and video aims to collapse time, space, and identity through the blurring of fiction and documentary devices as well as photographic manipulations. In her video piece Traveling, the viewer sees two representations of a single woman, distanced by sixty years, engaged in interview, the dialogue exists on its own terms, overlapping the scenes without boundaries. It seems as though Deirdre’s primary concern is to question the limitations of experience once the experiencer has lost the sense of self.

All of the physical and online work, six pieces in total, insert the belief that our contemporary lives are not singular existences, but divided by the digital and the real. The interplay between the work in Coping Copy reveals a non-narrative vantage point. From this, the viewer imbues their own experiences of the self in a symbiosis of form and formlessness.

– Daniel Herwitt

 

Download and run Traveller on your Mac.